axial objects

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axial objects

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In the axial object Confingering Figures (axial drawing music 1) (2005) (13 min. 07 sec.) fingers are holding graphite in the process of doing two-handed axial drawing, and in the actual process and movement they embody a configurative state somehow equivalent to the drawing itself. This embodiment of configuration (a state between figuration and abstraction) is visually and aurally accessible only under the specific intimate condition of video slow-motion, as a time/space-based art/music. By focusing below the frame rate threshold (30 fps) the piece exposes the otherwise invisible gaps between rapid actions and discovers its own strange beauty in which space itself is figurative and image is temporalized to the point of abstraction. Recorded on Amtrak train between Rhinecliff and NYC in 2005.

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The axial object Pulp Friction (2003, v. 4) (16 min. 19 sec.) comprises a non-narrative, material, bodily, performative engagement with art pulp (strange paper, specially created by Fluxus artist Alison Knowles for sound performance [for which she has used this video and title]). The result—“sculptural video,” “configurative erotics,” “abstract concretion”—effects a loud, frictive manipulation of translucently textured “sounding papers.” Intimate play as biomorphogenesis.

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axial hands (somamudra 1) (2007) (4 min. 04 sec.) comprises a non-narrative, bodily, performative engagement called Somamudra (an axial-hands practice created by GQ in the early 1970s). Developed for solo performance in conjunction with the poetic work Somapoetics (1973), it has subsequently been used over the years in performances with Gary Hill and Charles Stein. Intimate play as biomorphogenesis. Somamudra offered the first opportunity for the discovery of the principle of configuration as liminal image-formation. According to this view art can be neither figurative nor abstract but simultaneously open to both—configurative art. A sequence of several seconds is edited below the framerate (30 fps) to reveal further configuration. Performance, editing: George Quasha. Camera: Sherry Williams. Special edit for the Dorsky Configuration of “Axial Objects” installation in the 2007 Samuel Dorsky Museum one-person show at SUNY New Paltz.~~

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wreck (2010) (2 min. 02 sec.) records with a rapidly moving camera a sailboat on the Hudson River, viewed from the shore in Barrytown, New York, and takes a sequence of several seconds below the framerate (30 fps) to reveal further configuration.

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wave black (2010) (1 min. 56 sec.), an axial object, records with a hand-held HD camera (Sony HVR Z1U) an incoming wave near sunset on the Hudson River, viewed at the Barrytown shore, and takes a sequence of several seconds below the framerate (30 fps) to reveal further configuration (e.g., substantial black).

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turning green (2010) (4 min. 34 sec.), an axial object, recorded 10.10.10 with a hand-held HD camera (Sony HVR Z1U) at the Barrytown shore near sunset on the Hudson River, and takes an edited sequence of under a minute below the framerate (30 fps) to reveal further configuration (e.g., green transmogrifying). Sound track: axial percussion created by GQ 10.10.10 on a Roland Octapad.
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suns / eyes (2011) (2 min. 57 sec.) is an axial object with axial music. Video (Sony HVR Z1U) and drumming (Roland Octapad) by George Quasha.

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The original video (2009) in Barrytown, New York, over the Hudson River at sunset, and edited according to the method of axial landscapes.

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